Let’s begin - step by step

Step 1: First scrape the wax residue from the fabric; an ice cube speeds up the hardening process.

 

Step 2: The grease stain left by the wax should then be pre-treated. This way it will have no chance against the washing machine.

 

Step 3: Wash the pre-treated fabric as hot as the care label allows and with a Persil® detergent that is suitable for the color and material, for example ProClean® Stain Fighter or Oxi Power.


Done! In the best-case scenario, the wax stain will have disappeared, but if the stain is being stubborn (colored wax is often harder to remove), repeat the process.

 

Expert tip: If the wax stain has not completely disappeared, the garment shouldn’t be put in the dryer, otherwise the stain will really set in.

 

It’s not only the wax that needs removing

There are several types of wax that can leave stains on textiles. Whether it’s from a candle or crayon, it usually isn’t the wax itself that needs the greatest attention when cleaning, but the grease stain that’s left over. Colored wax stains are even tougher to remove so you should plan for several washes – or even a trip to the dry-cleaners. Some wax stains can only be removed with very special solvents.

 

Removing wax stains step by step

Here are the guidelines for removing wax stains from clothes, tablecloths, and other textiles. Simply follow the steps below to remove the stubborn stains.

 

Remove the wax

The wax must be properly hardened and removed before washing the garment. During a candlelight dinner – when you would rather be doing anything else than treating a stain – you can place an ice cube on the wax stain to make it set more quickly. If the garment isn’t too large, you can throw it in the freezer after dinner. You can then scrape off the wax with a spoon or blunt knife, or simply break up the frozen wax with your fingers.

 

Pre-treat the stain

To make it as difficult as possible for the stain to take refuge in the fibers, you should pre-treat it before washing. You can also spray a stain remover over the stain and the area around it – until the fabric is properly soaked through. Always follow the instructions and test the clothing’s color fastness first on an inconspicuous spot.

 

After pre-treatment, continue with these next steps before the stain remover has time to dry out.

 

Normal wash


First, see what washing instructions are printed on the care label. It is best to wash the textile at the highest possible temperature – at least 120 to 140°F (50 to 60°C) would be best. Select a detergent that’s specifically for tough stains, such as Persil® Power-Liquid® Stain Fighter , and use the amount indicated on the package for “heavily soiled” laundry.

 

 

If the stain is still there…

Wax stains can be really stubborn. If the stain refuses to budge even after several wash cycles, it’s time to admit defeat and take it to the dry-cleaners. Your tablecloth will be as good as new for the next dinner party.

 

If the wax stain already dried up…

Clothes with wax stains should never be placed in the dryer. Because then the wax will melt and further penetrate and travel in the fabric, making it stick to the fabric even more. But children don’t always report every stained sweater sleeve, so it can often be overlooked. Once the mishap has happened, scrape off as much wax as possible. Then patiently remove the wax and follow pretreating directions as described above.

 


Once the wax is properly removed, follow steps two and three and wash the sweater in the washing machine to remove any remaining grease and color from the fibers. Then your child can experience many more adventures in their favorite sweater.